Ada Lovelace by Isabel Sanchez Vegara, Zafouko Yamamoto | Review

Book Synopsis

This board book version of Ada Lovelace—an international bestseller from the beloved Little People, BIG DREAMS series—introduces the youngest dreamers to the world’s first computer programmer.

As a child, Ada had a big imagination and a talent for mathematics. She grew up in a noble household in England, where she dedicated herself to studying. Her work with the famous inventor, Charles Babbage, on a very early kind of computer made her the world’s first computer programmer. Babies and toddlers will love to snuggle as you read to them the engaging story of this fascinating mathematician, and will also enjoy exploring the stylish and quirky illustrations of this sturdy board book on their own.

Little People, BIG DREAMSis a best-selling series of books and educational games that explore the lives of outstanding people, from designers and artists to scientists and activists. All of them achieved incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream.

This empowering series offers inspiring messages to children of all ages, in a range of formats. The board books are told in simple sentences, perfect for reading aloud to babies and toddlers. The hardcover versions present expanded stories for beginning readers. Boxed gift sets allow you to collect a selection of the books by theme. Paper dolls, learning cards, matching games, and other fun learning tools provide even more ways to make the lives of these role models accessible to children.

Inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world with Little People, BIG DREAMS!

My Thoughts

This is a non-fiction book about the life of Ada Lovelace. Part of the series, ‘Little People, BIG DREAMS’, “Ada Lovelace” is the tenth book and the first one I’ve read.

Ada’s mum liked maths and her dad liked poetry and when she was still very small, Ada and her mum had to go and live with Ada’s Grandma and her cat. Encouraged by her mum, Ada, too, liked maths and problem-solving and, much later, she meets inventor, Charles Babbage. They worked together developing a machine that led to the computer as we know it today.

The wonderful illustrations in “Ada Lovelace” really complement the text and I am sure both adults and small children will delight in this book as much as I did!

[Thanks to #NetGalley and Quarto Publishing Group for my ARC of #AdaLovelace in exchange for an honest review.]  

Brianne’s Book Reviews Rating | Five Stars

Happy Reading!

Advertisements
The White Headhunter

The White Headhunter by Nigel Randell

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Reading “The White Headhunter” was a complete change of genre for me and although I had a few reservations about the choice, I’m really pleased I decided to go with it.

This first book by Nigel Randell is a work of non-fiction. A teenage Scots sailor, Jack Renton, was rescued from captivity on the Pacific island of Malaita, home to a fearsome tribe of headhunters. In his memoir, Renton recounted his eight-year adventure: how he jumped ship and drifted two thousand miles in an open whaleboat to the Solomon Islands, came ashore at Malaita and was stripped of his identity. For all it’s detail and authenticity Renton’s chronicle glossed over many key events. This book is a more complete and grislier account of Renton’s experience.

Very well presented and easy to read “The White Headhunter” contains some fascinating history of the late 19th century and the Pacific with some entertaining and enlightening information about the period. This true story was interesting, enjoyable and well worth the read.

[Thank you to #NetGalley, #ThistlePublishing and #NigelRandell, for a free ARC of #TheWhiteHeadhunter in exchange for an honest review.]



View all my reviews