Ada Lovelace by Isabel Sanchez Vegara, Zafouko Yamamoto | Review

Book Synopsis

This board book version of Ada Lovelace—an international bestseller from the beloved Little People, BIG DREAMS series—introduces the youngest dreamers to the world’s first computer programmer.

As a child, Ada had a big imagination and a talent for mathematics. She grew up in a noble household in England, where she dedicated herself to studying. Her work with the famous inventor, Charles Babbage, on a very early kind of computer made her the world’s first computer programmer. Babies and toddlers will love to snuggle as you read to them the engaging story of this fascinating mathematician, and will also enjoy exploring the stylish and quirky illustrations of this sturdy board book on their own.

Little People, BIG DREAMSis a best-selling series of books and educational games that explore the lives of outstanding people, from designers and artists to scientists and activists. All of them achieved incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream.

This empowering series offers inspiring messages to children of all ages, in a range of formats. The board books are told in simple sentences, perfect for reading aloud to babies and toddlers. The hardcover versions present expanded stories for beginning readers. Boxed gift sets allow you to collect a selection of the books by theme. Paper dolls, learning cards, matching games, and other fun learning tools provide even more ways to make the lives of these role models accessible to children.

Inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world with Little People, BIG DREAMS!

My Thoughts

This is a non-fiction book about the life of Ada Lovelace. Part of the series, ‘Little People, BIG DREAMS’, “Ada Lovelace” is the tenth book and the first one I’ve read.

Ada’s mum liked maths and her dad liked poetry and when she was still very small, Ada and her mum had to go and live with Ada’s Grandma and her cat. Encouraged by her mum, Ada, too, liked maths and problem-solving and, much later, she meets inventor, Charles Babbage. They worked together developing a machine that led to the computer as we know it today.

The wonderful illustrations in “Ada Lovelace” really complement the text and I am sure both adults and small children will delight in this book as much as I did!

[Thanks to #NetGalley and Quarto Publishing Group for my ARC of #AdaLovelace in exchange for an honest review.]  

Brianne’s Book Reviews Rating | Five Stars

Happy Reading!

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The DNA of You and Me

The DNA of You and Me by Andrea Rothman

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


This is a brilliantly unique debut novel about scientific discovery versus love. “The DNA of You and Me” begins when Emily Apellis, the protagonist, is told that she is to receive a great award in the scientific community. The author, Andrea Rothman, then takes the reader back to when Emily first started studying the science of smell and the choices she made along the way.

Justin McKinnon has hired new graduate student Emily to study the science, however, Justin hasn’t told Emily that two other scientists in the lab, Aeden and Allegra, are working on a very similar topic, and their findings may compete with Emily’s own research.

Emily is extremely focused and driven. She’s always been more comfortable in the science lab than making small talk with strangers. Unfazed by competition, analysing DNA data is her favourite thing. To Emily’s great surprise, her rational mind is unsettled by Aeden. As they shift from competitors to colleagues and then to something more, Emily begins to see a future where she may not end up alone. But when Aeden decides to leave the lab, it becomes clear to Emily that she must make a choice – will she follow her research or follow her heart?

Andrea Rothman’s writing style is quite special in this novel as she manages very nicely to create characters that could have been rather boring, though, in fact, were anything but. The same can be said for the story-line. For some, science is not necessarily the most riveting of subjects, however, there is a brilliant and a very appealing mix of romance, love and scientific detail in “The DNA of You and Me”.

Completing each chapter with a thought, appreciation, something to dwell on or ruminate about before moving forward, was a neat and clever touch by Andrea Rothman. This quick and pleasant read really holds its own and I recommend that you get a copy!

{Thank you to Edelweiss and HarperCollins UK/ William Morrow for the free copy of this book and for giving me the opportunity to provide an honest review.}



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